best 10 person tent

Summer is in full swing and autumn is almost here — prime camping season. But what if you don’t have a tent? Not to worry! This guide will show you everything you need to know to pick the best 10 person tent. Read along, take a few notes, and before you know it, you’ll be roasting marshmallows by the bagful in your brand new home away from home.

1. The CORE Nine-Person Instant Cabin Tent

Got a big family? Maybe you just pack everything in and out when you camp, Sherpa-style. If so, this tent might just be the best 10 person tent for you. With an assembly / take-down time of roughly 60 seconds, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a quicker set-up process. Roominess won’t be an issue, either, even for the tallest of party members: Headroom is a breezy 72 inches (six feet). The tent, of course, sleeps nine, and can readily accommodate most of your gear, although you’ll want to leave the obvious stuff – bikes, really muddy things, etc. — outside. Speaking of which, the rain fly and water resistance is a nice touch, as is the wide array of lurid colors (this isn’t a tent you’re gonna lose!). Of course, it’s not all sunshine and rainbows; even the best tent has some dings. Let’s investigate a little more thoroughly.

PROS

  • Roomy enough for the whole family or spacious enough to make one or two people feel like royalty, even with big sleeping bags and gear included.
  • Lightning-fast, kid-friendly set-up and take-down procedure. All the poles, stanchions, and so forth come pre-attached, so set-up is literally a matter of standing upright and sticking the tent poles into the ground.
  • Super-bright, specially treated shell makes this tent attractive, easy to spot in a crowded campsite or dense forest, and resistant to surprise downpours.
  • A generous double door makes getting in and out a snap, even with “stuff” loading you down.

CONS

  • This isn’t a survival tent. It’s meant for family fun. With that in mind, if you’re going to be in some particularly hostile environment, the tent’s own bottom won’t protect you from ground temperatures and / or obstacles. Nor is it sufficiently insulated against adverse temperature extremes to serve as a barrier. You’re gonna need a tarp or other supplemental barrier (perhaps more than one) as well as insulation if you want to be comfortable in more extreme settings.
  • Durability can be an issue. This is particularly true in the case of certain seams (hypotenuse, windows), which have been known to rip.

2. The Coleman Montana 8 Eight-Person Tent

Another entry on the best 10 person tent list, the Coleman Montana 8 is geared toward the car-camping set: Those families who like to portage not just themselves and their regular supplies but smartphones and laptops, too. It all has to fit, and with this tent in your arsenal, that’s exactly what happens. It takes a bit to set up / take down, but even as an eight-person tent, it’s bigger than most tents billed as something larger. All the standard bells and whistles are there, too: Windows, rain flies, and so on. Even a door with hinges! Of course, the Coleman name is what you’ll probably give most of your weight to in the purchasing decision. Speaking of which, there are some things you’ll want to watch out for if you choose this tent, which is why we’ve lined up the pros and cons below. Let’s check ’em out!

PROS

  • Coleman has been turning out outdoor supplies for generations, and as such, it’s a name you can trust when you’re shopping for tents (or anything else in the camping ecosystem).
  • The Montana 8 is as spacious as its namesake — billed for eight, you could easily use this as a ten person tent if you don’t plan on cramming it to the rafters with everything you own.
  • A 74-inch floor-to-ceiling height means even the tallest men and women can use this tent in comfort.
  • There’s a neat little e-port flap to run your cables through so you can charge your electronics and pass them through to the inside of your tent without having to make a million trips.

CONS

  • The warranty is quite skimpy on this tent, especially when you consider a tent’s intended use in rougher terrain, and especially for a company like Coleman.
  • This tent, whatever the marketing materials might say, is not waterproof or weather-resistant to any real degree. It has a tendency to leak, and leak badly. Not all of them do this, of course, but it’s definitely worth noting that you might run into this issue.
  • Having all your expensive gadgets routed through from your car or other power source and into your (potentially leaky) tent might end up being a costly or even dangerous misstep.
  • While not everyone will see this as a negative, this tent is manufactured in / sourced from China, so if you’re looking to buy American-made products exclusively, you’ll want to steer clear.

3. The Coleman Sundome (Various Sizes)

The first multi-size offering in our guide, the Sundome line of tents from Coleman offers a wide range of choices to suit any party. However, if you’re looking for the best 10 man tent, the Sundome will present a unique challenge, namely size. You won’t be able to do it in one shot; you’ll need to buy at least two, probably three if you want to make a ten-person trip work with these tents. We’ve taken the liberty of compiling a pro / con list below for your convenience, take a look and see if you feel the way we do: Overall, the Sundome by Coleman makes a nicely balanced little tent.

PROS

  • Quality is great. Materials are, for a consumer-grade tent, quite durable and reliable.
  • Plenty of screens for keeping things airy and adding a nice view (skylight, windows, and so on).
  • Set-up / take-down of the Sundome tent takes less than 15 minutes, which means you can probably let your kids do it, if you’re bringing them along.
  • Waterproofing / rain protection is adequate, but don’t expect it to get you through a monsoon.

CONS

  • The seams in this tent can sometimes be, if not shoddy, at least a little bit suspect in places. They come pre-taped to diminish instances of ripping, drafts, etc., but you’ll still be well-served by buying some sealant or patches or other such devices, just in case.
  • Stakes are a bit low-quality. Buy some you’re comfortable with using, otherwise you’ll be stuck with the flimsy, cheap, pre-packaged steel ones they give you.

4. The Coleman Weathermaster

The Coleman Weathermaster is a 10 person tent that, if spacious and roomy enough for an army and all its supplies, still manages to fall somewhat short of its name. In other words, this is an outdoor dwelling that forgot to play to its strengths, choosing instead to masquerade (poorly) as something it turns out not to be. Even so, with a bit of ingenuity, you can have the best of both worlds, in which case, this tent turns out to be quite the get. It just comes down to whether you want to mess with it. At any rate, as with our other entries, we’ve given you a pro / con breakdown below. Feel free to peruse and see what’s what.

PROS

  • This tent is absolutely vast. Ten people? Shoot, you could fit twice that, probably, if you were willing to get cozy. Ten people plus gear will be a cinch.
  • Set-up / take-down is easy, provided you aren’t trying to do it yourself. You’ll need at least one other person to help you, or an easy job will quickly become an exercise in self-control and anger suppression.
  • Thanks to the plentiful vents, screens, and other openings, you’re gonna get plenty of airflow / breeziness, making this one of the best 10 person tents for a truly crammed in, cheek-by-jowl home base.
  • The floor is waterproof to a moderate degree.

CONS

  • The floor might be reasonably water resistant, but it’s pretty much the only part of the Weathermaster that is. Coleman really threw a curve ball here; you’re going to need to weatherproof the tent yourself with supplementary materials if you’re going anywhere even remotely rainy or waterlogged.
  • The stakes are cheap, tending to vary in quality from tent to tent. They’re perfectly usable if you get a good pair, but who wants to play quality roulette with such an integral part of their equipment? No one, that’s who. In other words, the odds are good you’ll end up buying aftermarket stakes.
  • This tent is marketed toward groups, but even so, the fact that a single person can’t erect or dismantle it quickly is a real pain.
  • From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the drab, off-beige color of the Weathermaster is just awful.

5. The CORE 12 Person Instant Cabin Tent

Getting a little fancier, this next entry on our list will likely be the best 10 person tent for anyone looking for a camping solution that offers simplicity and privacy for everyone. Set-up / take-down procedures take literal minutes to accomplish; you can choose to share one big, open space or make private rooms between several campers, and once you’re all in there, you’ll have plenty of room for you, your stuff, and hey — you’ll even be able to stand upright, no matter if you top six feet! Of course, there’s some stuff to watch out for, too, so let’s take a closer look at this tent’s collection of pluses and minuses and see what’s what with the CORE 12 Person Instant Cabin Tent.

PROS

  • Getting this tent up and back down again couldn’t be easier. Whether your party is full of seasoned adventurers in their prime, novices, kids and the elderly, or a mixture, you can rest assured that anyone able to read instructions can set up or break camp faster than you can say “s’more”.
  • Got a few taller folks in your group? No problem! This tent easily accommodates campers of six feet and over.
  • There’s a ton of little stash pockets and hanger loops integrated into this tent, making the question of where to put your gear a non-issue. You can even hang a reading light or a lantern if you want.
  • Multiple doors (front and back) make getting around easy even with large groups, and a mesh skylight is a nice touch if you need extra venting or just want to see a bit of sky.
  • This tent seems to do better in the rain than other Coleman tents, which is a boon both to Coleman fans and to anyone who doesn’t like to wake up soaking wet and half-sick from what was supposed to be a great trip. Use this tent, and you’ll stay snug and happy all the way through.

CONS

  • For whatever reason — construction, stake build quality, or something else — this tent is a huge wind catch. If you want to sleep soundly in an area that’s at all prone to gusts, you’re gonna need extra stakes, and you’re gonna need to put them in firmly.
  • You can’t zip or cinch or otherwise open / close the vents at will, so if you’re looking for climate control, look elsewhere. This can be a real problem when you consider the temperature / climate extremes that can sometimes go hand in hand with this hobby.

6. The Coleman Instant Family Eight-Person Tent

Next up is another Coleman entry, this time a model for eight people. If you absolutely must squeeze ten people into this tent, they should be smaller (kids, slightly-built older siblings) with another tent for adults and, if necessary, another tent for gear. It isn’t that this tent is claustrophobic by any means, it’s just not as big as some of the other entries on our list. In fact, you’ll find that you can fit up to two queen airbeds in the tent and still have a bit of space, all while standing upright at six feet or taller. It’s all about economy and planning. As you might have gathered by now, some negatives do creep into this tent, some general, some specific to Coleman (which we’ve touched on before in this guide). As always, we’ll take a look at a pro / con breakdown just below.

PROS

  • Roomy and spacious, you’ll be able to fit enough gear and folks in here to make this a comfy eight-person tent.
  • It can’t be overstated how great of a feature this is: You don’t know what it is to lack it until you need it the most. Luckily, you’ll never have to find out, since this tent offers a super-easy set-up / take-down process to its inhabitants.
  • Tired of having to pass on trips because none of the tents on offer can accommodate you? Well pass no longer! This tend is tall enough for just about anyone — people of six feet or under will be able to stand upright with room to spare.
  • Depending on where you camp, the weather can swing from one temperature extreme to another and back again or hang on a stifling median for hours. Luckily, this tent offers plenty of airflow thanks to lots of screens, windows, and multiple doors for entry / exit.
  • Multiple doors means you don’t have to bunch up in a mob at the start or end of your day – just come and go as you please.

CONS

  • As with some other Coleman tents, waterproofing is spotty to non-existent, whatever the marketing materials might tell you. You’re gonna need some after-market stuff put on your tent(s) if you want to stay dry.
  • Don’t lose your guy lines. Ever. They’re what make your tent so easy to handle, and if they foul or go missing, you’re in a bad way, big time, to the point the tent becomes nigh-unusable.
  • This tent catches wind like nobody’s business due to an excess of fabric in construction. Double-stake it, or else!
  • It can be a real pain to get this thing back in the bag at the end of your trip, and no one bothers to point out in the instructions that the stitching in the carrying pouch is meant to come out. It’s an expansion sleeve.
  • You won’t be able to fit 10 people in just one tent, so this just can’t be called the best 10 person tent on the market, at least not by itself.

7. Tenaya LED Fast Pitch Cabin Tent

This tent, in spite of its blemishes, has been called a mansion and “the best thing ever”. Now, all that’s up for debate, obviously, but it does have some pretty sweet features. When’s the last time you saw a tent with interior lighting and shelves? Yeah. Of course, none of that matters if you can’t read the instructions or a vital part is always breaking, so we’ve whipped up a list of pros and cons — you’ll find them below — to help you decide for yourself if this is the tent you want for yourself and your group.

PROS

  • If you’re looking for a tent with a wow factor, this is definitely it. Interior LED lighting, shelves, even closets… you may decide to stay forever.
  • The colors on these tents are really bright and attractive, which is a nice change from the somewhat drab normal sphere of tents.
  • Water-resistance is better than average for a Coleman (which is Tendaya’s parent brand).
  • Space is ample for the size offerings available. Don’t be afraid to bring your gear along with you!

CONS

  • First and foremost, this tent suffers from the same malady as the last tent we reviewed, namely that large groups might not be able to use it. It’s great for four to six people plus gear, but if you’re a group of ten, you’ll need at least two of them, and probably three, to make your trip work. That’s fine if you’ve got room in your budget (and your car), but if not, it can be a real drag.
  • The instructions that come with this tent can be bland, confusing, and generally unhelpful. Never a good thing when you’re out in nature and you just want to sleep after a long day exploring the environment.
  • On a related note, set-up & take-down can be slow, especially for novices, because in spite of the name, it takes two people almost ten minutes at best, and with bad instructions guiding unsure hands, well… you do the math.
  • This tent’s poles are made of carbon. Carbon is great for racing bikes, but not so great when it comes to vital load bearing structures like tent frames. It’s not unheard of for the Tendaya Fast Pitch to have a catastrophic frame failure. Nothing says “trip over” like a main pole break at three in the morning.

8. The CORE 11-Person Family Cabin Tent

No beating around the bush on this one: If a giant crawled off his beanstalk and went looking for a tent, this is the tent he’d pick. It’s huge, it’s orange, it’s got more features than you can shake a stick at, and it’s our next entry on the list of contenders for best 10 person tent. You can check out the pro / con summary below.

PROS

  • This first one’s a no-brainer: If you’re looking for the world’s most giant tent, stop looking. Ten people can fit in this thing, plus their gear, and probably a pet or two as well. Are you tall? Great! Party members up to 6′,4″ will have extra head room.
  • You can leave this tent as one giant open space, or you can zip it into compartments to separate gear from people or to cordon off kids from adults (or kids from other kids, if things get rowdy). It’s all about choices.
  • An ample screen room (rather than lots of little screened windows) provides air conditioning + bug control. The main room also has a huge mesh skylight.
  • This tent has several electrical points, making it a great choice if you happen to be using it with an RV, or even if you need to charge the occasional gadget in the middle of nowhere from your car.
  • An integrated gear loft and a whole bunch of pockets make stowing your gear really convenient, which can’t be underestimated after a long day of trekking through the bush.
  • Color-coded poles make setting up this tent, dare we say it, fun and easy! There’s nothing worse than a fight that breaks out over something so silly as setting up or tearing down a tent; it can ruin a trip that has, until that moment, been just great.
  • Great color choices

CONS

  • This thing is a beast, weighing in at over 40 lbs., so don’t expect set-up and take-down to be a one person job or a job for children. This will take at least two adults.
  • The tent lacks both footprint and tarp, which means you lack any kind of protection from groundwater. Buy them both, or prepare to wake up lying in a lake when it inevitably rains.
  • * There aren’t any pass-through entrances inside this tent, so you’re going to have to go all the way through to get from one side to the other. That is to say, if you’re sleeping in the middle screen room, you’re in the highest traffic area in the whole tent.
  • * This tent is, in fact, so large, that you might be restricted in the number of campsites you’re able to access.
  • * If you’re not at least six feet tall, you probably won’t be able to reach the gear loft without a step stool.
  • * The tent’s fabric can rip at the stake points if you’re rough with it, which is a real shame considering its intended use.
  • * Instructions don’t mention that you can actually rip the stitching out of the carry bag the tent comes in — it’s the only way you’ll be able to expand it like the pictures show.

9. The CORE Nine-Person Extended Dome Tent

There isn’t a lot to say about this tent that wasn’t said immediately prior, since this tent is the CORE 11’s little brother. Designed for one to three day trips rather than weeks in the bush, this tent is great for what it is. Also, for the record, it might say “nine person” on the label, but it’ll hold an extra person with minimal difficulty, although not in the hotel-like comfort we spoke about in the previous entry. With that in mind, let’s take a look at the pros and cons below.

PROS

  • Plenty of room for ten and their gear makes this a great option for trips from a few days to a week or so.
  • An electrical point (shared) makes this an option worth considering if you travel with your car or RV.
  • Bright color options like flouro-orange and wine make a nice change from more traditional drab options.
  • Holds up pretty well in the rain — don’t go out of your way to test it, but you should stay dry in all but the craziest of downpours. Just make sure you stake everything down nice and tight to avoid pooling, and get a tarp + footprint.
  • This tent has a 72-inch standing height, so even taller campers should feel right at home.

CONS

  • Set-up / breaking this tent down might not be as swift a procedure as you’re used to with other tents.
  • Not clear if this bag is a “rip-away collapsible” type or just too small for the tent. Either way, packing up can be an exercise in tedium and frustration.

10. The TOMOUNT Eight-Person Tent

Last but not least, this tent from TOMOUNT will wrap up our list. While not strictly designed to hold ten people, if you’ve got a sleepover coming up or something of that sort, you could easily fit ten kids in this, plus snacks, comics, a couple Nintendo Switches, and so on. Of course, it falls short in a few areas, too, but that’s OK — you have us! A list of pros and cons follows.

PROS

  • This might just be the perfect tent for your kids and all their little friends. It’s just the right size and has all the right features. Adults, however, may find things a bit more cramped if they choose to attempt anything more than eight people to a tent.
  • Assembly / teardown is a reasonable process, but you might have to peek at the instructions once in a while. This is OK, since everything is thoughtfully numbered and color-coded for your convenience.
  • Surprisingly for a less well-known brand, this might be the best entry on the list when it comes to consumer-grade wind / rain resistance.

CONS

  • Zippers are often the first things to go on luggage and tents and other things of that nature, but the quality of these are still unknown. Why does this matter? Because there’s only one way in — no zipper, no entry… or exit. Also, these zippers can sometimes snag on the fabric of this tent, which is itself thin and prone to tearing.
  • The poles of this tent have been known to break under load, collapsing the whole thing on top of you in your sleep, while you’re reading, or during some other entirely inopportune time.
  • Strong winds can sometimes overwhelm this tent, even if it does tend to do better than some other entrants in this guide.

 

 

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